Travel

Travel (8)

travel category

Monday, 03 March 2014 07:53

Travel 8

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Sharing 98% of our DNA, orangutans are one of the closest relatives to man, though if predictions are accurate, Asia's only two great ape species could be extinct in the wild within the next decade.

Conservation groups such as Borneo Orangutan Survival have bolstered numbers through rehabilitation and release programs, but the illegal pet trade, trafficking and habitat destruction still present the greatest threats to the survival of orangutans on the only two islands they inhabit: Borneo and Sumatra.

Monday, 03 March 2014 07:52

Travel 7

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Remaining virtually undiscovered for centuries did much to preserve the living showcase of evolution described by Charles Darwin in "The Origin of Species."

But Ecuador's best known ecosystem remains fragile.

The last remaining Pinta Island tortoise, fondly known as Lonesome George, died in 2012, adding to the list of several other species that have died out since Darwin's 1835 visit.

How to do it: While it's possible to fly to Galapagos from mainland Ecuador and visit several islands independently, you can only reach the bulk of protected habitats on heavily regulated organized cruises.

You can expect to pay from around $1,500 for a last-minute, week-long cruise organized in the capital Quito or Puerto Ayora on the island of Santa Cruz.

Monday, 03 March 2014 07:51

Travel 6

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Endemic to the forests of central Africa, both species of the world's largest primate have been decreasing in numbers for decades largely due to poaching and disease.

Worryingly, a 2010 United Nations report suggested that these gentle giants of the forest might disappear from large parts of the Congo Basin, one of their primary habitats, by the mid-2020s.

MORE: Film chronicles destruction of "gringo" travel trail

How to do it: Wilderness Collection offers gorilla tracking opportunities during a six-day tour, from $6,474 per person, split between two luxury Odzala camps (+27 11 807 1800) in an area of the Republic of the Congo that's home to a high density of western lowland gorilla.

Chimpanzee, leopard, golden cat and a large number of other primate and bird species are also present.

Monday, 03 March 2014 07:50

Travel 5

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The Great Barrier Reef, the world's largest reef system, is in peril.
Temperature fluctuations are primarily to blame for the disappearance of half its coral since 1985 and the Australian Institute of Marine Science predicts that less than a quarter could be left within a decade.

Following plans by the Australian government to industrialize parts of the reef, the World Heritage Committee passed a recommendation to consider listing the UNESCO site as "in danger" at a meeting in June 2014.

Monday, 03 March 2014 07:49

Travel 4

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While hunting is still allowed by some Arctic-dwelling native communities, it's climate change that poses the largest threat to polar bears.

Latest data from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) shows that eight of the 19 sub-populations of polar bear that roam the Arctic are in decline.

Scientists project that two-thirds of all polar bears could disappear by 2050.

Due to its southern exposure, Canada's Hudson Bay is one of the bear habitats most threatened by climate change -- increasing temperatures are forcing bears off the ice earlier each year.

Monday, 03 March 2014 07:45

Travel 3

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Ancient rock art images of animals moving across the African savannah indicate that humans have been marveling at animal migrations for more than 20,000 years.

But poaching, agriculture, war and deforestation are encroaching on wildlife corridors around the world, placing these animal movements -- from Africa's wildebeest migration to the annual pilgrimage of North American bison -- under threat.

Monday, 03 March 2014 07:42

Travel 2

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The origin of the word "travel" is most likely lost to history. The term "travel" may originate from the Old French word travail. According to the Merriam Webster dictionary, the first known use of the word travel was in the 14th century. It also states that the word comes from Middle English travailen, travelen (which means to torment, labor, strive, journey) and earlier from Old French travailler (which means to work strenuously, toil). In English we still occasionally use the words travail and travails, which mean struggle. According to Simon Winchester in his book The Best Travelers' Tales (2004), the words travel and travail both share an even more ancient root: a Roman instrument of torture called the tripalium (in Latin it means "three stakes", as in to impale). This link reflects the extreme difficulty of travel in ancient times. Also note the torturous connotation of the word "travailler." Today, travel may or may not be much easier depending upon the destination you choose (i.e., Mt. Everest, the Amazon rainforest), how you plan to get there (tour bus, cruise ship, or oxcart), and whether or not you decide to "rough it (see extreme tourism and adventure travel). "There's a big difference between simply being a tourist and being a true world traveler," notes travel writer Michael Kasum.

Monday, 03 March 2014 07:40

Travel 1

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Travel is the movement of people between relatively distant geographical locations, and can involve travel by foot, bicycle, automobile, train, boat, airplane, or other means, with or without luggage, and can be one way or round trip. Travel can also include relatively short stays between successive movements.